We need to talk about what Jamie did.

1 Jan

 

Brigg's Family Xmas card

Brigg’s Family Xmas card

Jamie Briggs resigned this week from his ministerial portfolio in the Turnbull government because of “inappropriate” behaviour towards a female public servant late one night in a Hong Kong bar, when he found himself apparently disinhibited by alcohol and the lateness of the hour.

Briggs was rapidly supported on Twitter by at least two of his colleagues, Finance Minister Mathias Cormann and Queensland MP Ewen Jones, both of whom describe Briggs as a good, decent man and a better bloke having a bad day. The Australian journalist Chris Kenny also came to Brigg’s defence on Twitter in a desperate attempt to frame the incident as being all about alcohol and staying up late in bars, with no reference to the alleged sexual harassment.

The public servant, it should be noted, did not complain that Briggs was drunk or up late, but that he had sexually harassed her, according to one report telling her she had such “piercing eyes,” before falling upon her neck. Mrs Estee Briggs, (who, like her husband, also worked for John Howard) is standing by her man, and has declared Prime Minister Turnbull’s sacking of her husband from the ministry an “exaggerated over-reaction” unwarranted by the triviality of the incident.

Some of us women set the bar low for ourselves, but perhaps we shouldn’t expect that the rest of the community will hold similar standards. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard women defend partners who act “inappropriately” towards them and other women, and what astonishes me every time is their expectation, indeed demand, that the rest of us hold the same minimal expectations.  Stand by your man by all means, but don’t tell others we’re “over-reacting” when we refuse to embrace your low standards.

It’s interesting that if a woman is drunk, and sexually harassed or assaulted, society’s default position is still that she shouldn’t have been drinking. On the other hand, the Briggs incident reaffirms for us that there are people in positions of considerable influence and power who still believe that if a man sexually harasses woman when he’s drunk it isn’t his fault: he’s really a decent bloke who’s had a hard day, and he can blame it on the drink. The woman, on the other hand, is a moll and a slut for getting out there and getting pissed and assaulted, and nobody even asks if she’s had a hard day.

I mean, really. When are we going to get past this? Ever?

I don’t know what Briggs’ defenders mean by “decent.” For mine, if you’re married and cheating on your spouse, you aren’t “decent.” You’re duplicitous, deceitful and probably more concerned with your own needs than those of your wife, family and lover. Infidelity demands a strong sense of entitlement, bordering on narcissism. It’s all about what the cheater thinks he/she needs, not the people he/she will damage. I mean, if you aren’t getting what you need in your partnership, have the courage to do something about it that doesn’t require duplicity and betrayal, or accept your lot. Deceiving the people who trust you is no way to address your needs.

As a man bent on betrayal once told me: I know I am behaving abominably to my wife and family, but you are so good for me. 

Says it all, really.

The point of this is that if a man (or woman) can justify the betrayal of those he/she cares most about, why would he/she think twice about betraying anybody else? We may know little else about the cheating spouse, but we do know with absolute certainty that he/she is a liar.

Ministerial standards are high, as they should be if governments are determined to give individual ministers the kind of power over others granted to Immigration Minister Dutton, for example. Why on earth should such power be in the hands of a man who has proved himself a liar, capable of intentionally deceiving his own wife? He’s demonstrated what he is willing to do to achieve his own ends: are we to be so naive as to think he’d only do this to his wife, and not the country?

The incident may not have been “illegal,” as Briggs hastens to assure us, though quite what he means by that I don’t know. It certainly highlights yet again that women are still seen by some societal groups as irrelevant in comparison to the needs and ambitions of men. Briggs was daft for getting drunk and staying up late, but hey, he’s human and works hard. Let’s not mention the predatory sexual behaviour: it was only a woman.

I don’t know the extent of Briggs’ harassment of the woman involved, what I do know is that until men like Briggs stop believing they are entitled to our attention and our bodies we have to call them on every incident, no matter how “trivial” it might seem to someone else. We are not comfort women for when such men are having a difficult time. We aren’t cuddly things for such men to grab and grope. Such men as Briggs are not inherently entitled to our bodies, our emotions, our attention and our time.

The “trivial” nature or otherwise of the sexual harassment is irrelevant here: what matters is the belief men such as Briggs hold that they are entitled to us whenever they feel the need of us. Nothing will substantially change for women until such men are disabused of this sense of entitlement, and until women who support these men demand higher standards from them instead of enabling them. We’re not “over-reacting” in thinking your husband should be fired, Mrs Briggs. It’s bad enough that men such as Jamie Briggs harass and assault us in the first place, we don’t have to lower our standards to yours as well.

Please note: I very rarely delete comments and even more rarely block people. However, I’ve just deleted an abusive comment from a poster called “Simon,” and will continue to delete and block abuse. This is a courtesy notification, so if abuse is on your mind you don’t waste your time.

 

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142 Responses to “We need to talk about what Jamie did.”

  1. John Samuel January 1, 2016 at 9:12 am #

    Well said.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 9:43 am #

      Thank you John. Happy New Year.

      Like

      • John Samuel January 1, 2016 at 10:04 am #

        You too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Anonymous January 4, 2016 at 4:50 pm #

        The larger damage in this situation is the embarrassment and shame his parents and children will suffer. It is reported his wife is supporting him so all I can say is “there are none so blind as those who do not want to see,
        hear etc.,”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 4, 2016 at 4:54 pm #

          Unfortunately, when someone in the public gaze makes bad choices, the rest of their family loses their privacy as well.

          If he was a close relative of mine I wouldn’t be sticking up for him.

          Like

    • epicyclo January 2, 2016 at 6:03 am #

      Aye, he sounds like a right good guy.
      When he’s not molesting young women, that is….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 10, 2016 at 8:08 am #

      A side-note as to the medium. And the message.

      And, of course, the outrage.

      I am starting to sound like @NeinQuarterly. Must watch that.

      Like

  2. Suziekue January 1, 2016 at 10:00 am #

    Thank you. And yes, it took considerable courage for the woman involved to call out Brigg’s behaviour. She should be applauded. The career and personal ramifications for sexual harassment complainants can often be severe. Public exposure (excuse the pun) of behaviour such as Brigg’s and its consequences will hopefully send a clear message to his ilk.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 1, 2016 at 10:23 am #

    Well may we need to talk about what Jamie did, but nothing exceeds the need in certain high places that we maintain the outrage and not inquire too closely as to what Mal Brough may have done.

    Initially, the tweet of this screenshot went astray, but a repeated attempt was successful. For colour:

    More to follow. I promise to be tangential.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 10:26 am #

      I’m expecting the AFP to continue their investigations into what Brough did…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 1, 2016 at 11:36 am #

        Of course.

        Meanwhile, courtesy of Twitter advanced search, I answer here one of my own questions posed in a comment on your listed related topic ‘Reist, Devine, & Sexually Suggestive Tweets’, because you have closed comments thereon.

        Bears upon the confection of outrage. I note some of the same participants engaging in what I think to be clickbaiting in relation to the present Briggs/Brough bootscooting.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 1, 2016 at 11:50 am #

          Here is a direct link to the comment in question:

          https://noplaceforsheep.com/2013/05/12/reist-devine-sexually-suggestive-tweets/#comment-72468

          Note how the claimable offensiveness of the tweet has been editorially amplified and focussed in Kenny’s piece in what purports to be a quote. And how early (before the tweetstorm #MTRsues) Adams’ tweet was.

          So is Kenny ( and possibly others) clickbaiting now in relation to Briggs’ stepping down?

          Like

          • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 2, 2016 at 7:55 am #

            Now that is interesting! Kenny is quoted as saying that tweet of Adams was launched into the twittersphere under the pseudonym ‘FakePaulKeating’. But the Twitter advanced search displays it, presumably correctly timestamped for 18 January 2012, as being posted under Adams current acknowledged handle ‘FlyOpineMonkey’.

            I wonder how that is/was possible. It is the twitter handle that appears to have been changed, and I don’t think a twitter user can do that.

            Could you tweet Daryl a link and see if he can shed any light on the seemingly evident searchability on Twitter of what is acknowledged to be the content of his tweet?

            Liked by 1 person

            • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 7:57 am #

              Forrest, I think he only changed his handle, not his entire account.

              I’ll link him with this

              Like

            • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 7:58 am #

              I can’t find where you’ve posted this comment Forrest

              Like

              • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 2, 2016 at 9:49 am #

                It is immediately above in the thread, and you have already responded to it at 7:57am.

                Stop looking at the hit counter.

                But never mind, I got the afterthought of tweeting a screenshot once I found the whole comment would fit in one screen, and Darryl has already responded on Twitter. He says there exists a unique userID number that TWITTER can use to relate different twitter handles for ‘historical’ tweets. Interesting, and thought provoking.

                Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 11:58 am #

          Will check that out Forrest.

          Like

  4. sjez January 1, 2016 at 11:49 am #

    Thanks for this. An excellent read.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Matthew da Silva January 1, 2016 at 11:54 am #

    Good summary of the reality of the situation. We need commentators who are insightful enough and courageous enough to tell the truth.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Micahel Lourey January 1, 2016 at 12:14 pm #

    Disturbing, on many levels, not least on the possible origins of the Briggs’ relationship! Taking Peter Costello’s ‘one for the country’ a bit too seriously?

    Liked by 3 people

    • townsvilleblog January 1, 2016 at 1:34 pm #

      He was after one for himself, while away he played, but was not successful, because she knocked him back and lodged a formal complaint. I wonder what his wife thinks about her tory husband?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 1:36 pm #

        Totally supportive, at least publicly.

        Like

        • Catherine January 1, 2016 at 4:35 pm #

          Perhaps you should consider why…the appearance of being ‘totally supportive’ may just be a protective measure for herself and her children until she can figure out what to do now her life has just exploded. I speak from actual experience, please be aware your instant black/white judgements do nothing to help when a person’s world has suddenly gone grey and her inmediate choices are extremely limited.

          Liked by 2 people

  7. ray hawkes January 1, 2016 at 12:42 pm #

    Thank you. A well written critique that is right on the mark. The photo is damning.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 1:18 pm #

      Thanks, Ray

      Like

    • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:54 am #

      Actually, the photo is repugnant, and using it like this should be a crime. If his wife wants to use her image and that of her children, fine. If an angry blogger with a left wing greeny femo-nazi axe to grind wants to use it, they should be sent to prison! Shame on you Jennifer Wilson!

      Like

      • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 11:42 am #

        I’m not a great blocker of people but I might make an exception for you, Someone.

        Like

        • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 12:09 pm #

          Why? Because you really can’t tolerate an opinion that is different to your own? You fit the stereotype perfectly. Go ahead!

          Like

      • Micahel Lourey January 2, 2016 at 3:08 pm #

        Well, actually pal, your image-conscious #LNP cretin published the photo as his Xmas card. Having put it out there, neither he, his wife nor his spear-carriers (and I’ve assumed you’re one) can complain where its clear use is to highlight his hypocrisy!!

        Liked by 2 people

      • mcintyre00 January 4, 2016 at 12:55 pm #

        he hides with pride

        Like

  8. eagoodlife January 1, 2016 at 12:46 pm #

    Reblogged this on The Life Of Von and commented:
    Yes indeed we do!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Andrew January 1, 2016 at 1:01 pm #

    Best piece I’ve read on this. Thank you.

    Like

  10. lawrencewinder January 1, 2016 at 1:09 pm #

    A good piece…. They’re an interesting bunch of mongrels this ruling rabble…. as are their women…

    Liked by 3 people

  11. townsvilleblog January 1, 2016 at 1:28 pm #

    The rumor I heard was that he was waving his warradonga in the bar.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 1:29 pm #

      Eeeewwwwwwwwwwww

      Liked by 2 people

    • marie blanch January 3, 2016 at 4:56 pm #

      Love this comment. I’m old enough to see patterns in politics and the hounding of Monica Lewinsky by the powerbrokers behind Clinton (and Hillary’s stance on the matter) is ringing bells in my memory bank. And look where Hillary is, compared to Monica, today.

      Like

  12. S. B January 1, 2016 at 1:57 pm #

    Love the way this has been written.
    Hear hear!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. doug quixote January 1, 2016 at 2:00 pm #

    Clearly his behaviour was unacceptable.

    His wife’s reaction is unsurprising, coloured by hearing his side of the story (only?) and by the loss of income their family will suffer.

    Well written, Guinevere.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 2:11 pm #

      Thanks DQ. Happy New Year, btw

      Liked by 1 person

    • Catherine January 1, 2016 at 5:00 pm #

      Speaking from experience, it’s not just the financial impact, it’s her whole foundation of her relationship, her values, her social and emotional web. Don’t be quick to judge her, she’s a victim too and needs time to process what this deceitful, arrogant self-serving dickhead has done. Give her time.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Kimberley January 1, 2016 at 2:34 pm #

    Right on! Well said. Thanks for speaking out, because someone needs to.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. davechaffeyhippie January 1, 2016 at 3:10 pm #

    Excellent article. I think James Briggs thought he was James Bond; travelling around the world, women falling into his bed and using gadgets to escape from death traps. Well welcome to the 21st century Mr Briggs.

    Like

  16. Trev January 1, 2016 at 3:45 pm #

    Has anyone considered the possibility that Jamie Briggs was warned by party power brokers that the series of recent immature behaviours was far from acceptable & had to stop?

    Liked by 1 person

  17. hannahquinn January 1, 2016 at 3:45 pm #

    I’ve lost count of the many, many times I’ve heard ‘good bloke’ ‘decent bloke’ ‘just having a few’ ‘just having fun’ ‘don’t take it so seriously’ blah blah blah excuses I’ve heard over a very long lifetime. Women are not ‘something for men’. They are individuals, humans with rights, especially to autonomy. It is the men who gather around the culprits of harassment, not to mention more serious offences such as assaults, who are equally as responsible. To excuse bad behaviour is to justify bad behaviour and adds nothing to the quality of life for either women or men. As David Morrison said, ‘The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.’ I’d add, ‘The standard you accept is the standard you are as a human being.’ To the men supporting Jamie Briggs as a ‘good and decent bloke,’ aim higher for yourselves.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 5:29 pm #

      Well said, Hannah

      Like

    • Marilyn January 2, 2016 at 1:45 am #

      When I reported my father for sexual molestation and finger fucking me over many years until he decided he should fuck me in proper so I could learn how babies are made from a grown up this is the reaction I got.
      1. the headmaster told me I was lying and suspended me from school.
      2. the policeman joked with him about it in the golf club – he later went to prison for raping his own daughter,
      3. the Anglican priest said he was a good bloke who helped fund the shiney new golf club – with money he had stolen from my mother during another beating.

      I was 12 years old.

      I hate these arseholes with a passion and get sick to death of sleazy shits thinking they can do whatever they want to the ”little glrls” in the offices.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dr. Love January 2, 2016 at 3:33 am #

        Unfortunately, woman engage in the exact same cover ups.

        I’m sorry to hear of your regrettable story.

        I wish you heaven and healing.

        Like

      • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:52 am #

        yeah, because this is the same….!

        Like

  18. @msmisrule January 1, 2016 at 4:05 pm #

    Bam! Mic drop!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Catherine January 1, 2016 at 4:26 pm #

    I agree but having been the wife in precisely this situation I can tell you that there is more than one woman hurting right now.
    Imagine having the rug pulled out from under your life without your action or knowledge. In Mrs Briggs case so very publically. You have no idea the pain these self centred arrogant addicts cause – not just to the women experiencing/reporting these incidents but the women left to pick up the smashed pieces of her and her children’s lives. Be aware that your comments and vitriol aimed at his actions also condemn her and her kids through not fault of their own.
    You lose everything (and almost everyone) like tsunami that engulfs every area of your life, especially your self respect and any respect for your ‘partner’. Be careful of your words, innocent parties are hurting right now too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • doug quixote January 1, 2016 at 5:13 pm #

      Always regret the collateral damage, Catherine. But it is too easy for a perpetrator to get away with bad behaviour by playing the “think of my wife and kids!” card.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 5:27 pm #

      Yes, I agree with you Catherine, many partners suffer terribly in these situations. Mrs Briggs’ defence of her husband’s behaviour suggests she thinks it unremarkable, however, and that he has been treated unfairly. It’s that to which I’m responding.

      I guess I’m very tired of women defending despicable male behaviour and blaming other women for their male partners’ infidelities. It’s enabling behaviour that doesn’t do anyone any good.

      As for the children: Estee Briggs posted the image of the family on Face Book after the scandal became public and Briggs had resigned, in a show of support, family unity, I assume.
      She didn’t disguise her children’s faces. I used an image that does.

      Like

      • Catherine January 1, 2016 at 7:13 pm #

        All fair points Jennifer.
        Mind you so far I haven’t seen her mention/blame the victim. Other than the pic, I haven’t seen anything much at all.

        I can’t speak to her motivesin posting it but all I know is it’s a complex painful series of personal layers which start to shed when faced with betrayal like this (betrayal which also affects your kids) and extended family and friends and their perception of your response.

        I’m just suggesting that maybe, just maybe to condemn and read into her actions so early in her grief is to perhaps pigeonhole her prematurely…after all denial is the oft stated first stage.

        I don’t disagree with your calling out his behaviour and the appalling reactions of some seeking to minimise the reality of it. I just wanted to say how very difficult the path alone through the wilderness can be.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 7:29 pm #

          Yes, I see what you are saying, Catherine.
          I very much object to the minimisation of the harassed woman’s complaints in defence of the husband, I suppose.
          But I understand your argument.

          Like

  20. sewingbutterfly January 1, 2016 at 5:16 pm #

    It constantly surprises me what people put up with from their partner. I know people who put up with having their phones checked regularly, forgoing boys/girls nights because they can’t bet ‘permission’, cheating and other inappropriate sexual attention to others as well as abuse (both emotional and physical), disrespectful behavior including derogatory comments in public. It astounds me when (mainly women) tell me I’m ‘lucky’ that my husband treats me so well. He treats me as his equal, with respect and love. And I treat him the same. We are a team, what hurts one of us, hurts both of us.

    However, there are many reasons why people stay. That kind of behavior usually progresses slowly, almost unnoticed, until they’re in that situation and have no idea how they ended up there. People stay for their children, or because they’re scared of being alone forever, low self esteem may make them feel they cannot function outside the relationship. Also, if that is how the majority of relationships operate, then people probably think that’s normal? I guess it is an extremely complicated psychological issue.

    I sympathize with his wife and children, they are hurting through no fault of their own. Of course she will defend him if she has chosen to remain in a relationship (for reasons known only to her). He is still the father of her children and they are completely innocent in this whole situation. Her situation is not unusual and the pain she must be feeling would be magnified by the focus of the media.

    His actions were reprehensible and he deserved to be sacked, just as ANYONE who harasses (sexually or otherwise) someone at their place of work does. He can be a decent bloke, he can be a good bloke. If he stands up and without offering excuses, owns his inappropriate behavior and apologises, unreservedly, without reference to his state of drunkeness. He now has the ability to actually say “Yes, what I did was wrong, I do not blame anyone for sacking me, I apologise to the woman who I harassed, I will endeavor to never ever do so again to any woman, because it is unacceptable.”

    As for the topic of alcohol, where do we start….if men are drunk it is a ‘laugh’, ‘bit of fun’ and considered acceptable. If women are drunk, it is ‘messy’ and morally wrong. We need a huge readjustment in our attitudes towards alcohol in this country.

    I second the person who quoted David Morrison ‘The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.’

    Liked by 1 person

  21. stewarthase January 1, 2016 at 5:50 pm #

    Cool!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. stewarthase January 1, 2016 at 5:51 pm #

    Pretty cool post!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Gary Kurzer January 1, 2016 at 6:09 pm #

    There is a very high level of scrutiny and moral commentary for “matters of sexuality,” in particular, for politicians. However, the fact that many of them are now acting illegally (as per confirmations by Gillian Triggs, Human Rights Commissioner), and are failing to follow the Model litigant Rules, and are acting corruptly towards the citizens, goes unreported, and with none of the scrutiny of the “sexual misdemeanours” (about which we may, or may not have the appropriate facts). This is more than a sad indictment of the media, but a fundamental failing that is presently destroying a lot of people and businesses. Australia is very corrupt, but apparently we have to *go hard* on sexual indiscretions, but ignore illegal, and “immoral” (in the higher sense of the word) actions by our politicians and bureaucrats.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Le blogeur gai January 1, 2016 at 6:29 pm #

    Bravo, very well said. Mrs Briggs is indeed an enabler.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Dr Love January 1, 2016 at 7:14 pm #

    Stupid bloody ignorant boooring nanny state opinion catering to the overkill and beat up of the miserably hypocritical and unloved, issue ridden, unwise feminist clones…

    I’m sorry we all haven’t past our sexual used by date!

    Thank good fuks for that!!

    Some of you people make me feel sick in your lap!! I bet you find that less offensive than a compliment and kiss. Dummies.

    Like

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 7:29 pm #

      What an erudite post

      Like

      • doug quixote January 1, 2016 at 7:42 pm #

        That’s what happens when you get 8,000 hits! Fame isn’t all its cracked up to be. 🙂

        Like

      • Dr. Love January 2, 2016 at 3:28 am #

        Are you congratulating yourself now for this utterly ridiculous tripe?

        Or are you exercising the dross sarcasm of every clone rad feminist in this country?

        We know it’s the latter.

        If I was to take action against every women who cracks into me in a lot worse ways then this pittiful incident, I’d have to spend my life in court making feminists and other women criminals. Hardly a sensible pastime, yet I assure you, it’s utterly accurate in every way.

        I’m so over the diatribe you contemporary Australian feminists write. It’s all just a lame paraphrase of each other. Banging. Banging. Banging away until nobody can see the much more reasonable reality anymore.

        The clichéd phrase,”The blind leading the blind,” has rarely ever been so apt.

        Your manipulative feminist clickbait is pathetic, boring and predictable. Furthermore, it’s riddled with such tediously blatant strawman arguments, we should immediately change that logical thinking error to “straw-women” arguments.

        There, I just did.

        If people need this crap to learn how to respect and be good to one another, I’ll stand corrected. But I don’t live in Boofhead town rural Oz. So maybe there is some use for this. Yet in the city, I assure you, many women aren’t the Saints people like you dribble them out to be.

        All this is generalised of course, but that’s all the Australian Contemporary feminists writers ever do. Create wildly absurd generalisations utilising the most dire and extreme cases of men being d!cks.

        I don’t need to do that to illustrate how woman can be total boobs, I assure you!

        The overload of self congratulation displayed by Australian contemporary feminist writers does it for anyone who chooses to realise any ideologically driven blather is just that, nothing more than mindless recited, rote spewed ideologue. It’s far from the truth and it’s far from equality or the best solution and outcome.

        You might be proud of adding more of the same to the genre, but I know it’s truly dross.

        Sincerely, I’m sorry, but I mustn’t tell a lie.

        Dr. Love.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 5:21 am #

          Settle, Petal

          Like

        • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:51 am #

          Now, thats articulate, and very accurate!

          Like

        • Gabrielle Travers January 2, 2016 at 9:11 pm #

          Dr Love….your moniker, oh the irony

          Like

  26. Sandy O'Sullivan January 1, 2016 at 7:49 pm #

    Thanks so much for this summary. Entirely agree, and it’s unfortunate that the main ramifications seemed to focus on just shuffling him out. I wish some of the broader media had this kind of analytical insight (might be hoping for a bit too much).

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Anonymous January 1, 2016 at 7:53 pm #

    Eloquently written

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 8:53 pm #

      Thank you

      Like

      • Marilyn January 2, 2016 at 1:48 am #

        Her support for the sexual predator is why I loathe Hillary Clinton standing by the arsehole Bill because she loved the limelight, money and kudos.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 6:44 am #

          I think you make a hugely significant point Marilyn. Women entwined with powerful men enjoy many advantages. Maybe if there’s to be a cultural shift, women have to be prepared to relinquish such advantages, and speak out against the men they associate with abusing other women, rather than supporting those men and denigrating the woman, as Hillary Clinton denigrated a very young and very vulnerable Lewinsky.

          Like

  28. Moods January 1, 2016 at 8:24 pm #

    Am I the only one that has picked up this little quote from the article?

    As a man bent on betrayal once told me: I know I am behaving abominably to my wife and family, but you are so good for me.

    This, to me, suggests that the author has in the past knowingly engaged in a relationship with a married man. But apparently it’s all the man’s fault. Her own morals are beyond reproach no doubt……

    And I couldn’t give two hoots what political party Briggs is from, it happens on both sides of politics all the time, by males AND females. Hell Bob Hawke was the best PM this country has ever had as far as I’m concerned, yet he was also a shameless womaniser. This doesn’t excuse the reckless behavior by Briggs, merely puts it into context. He has manned up (eventually) and stood down from his position.

    Careful you don’t break your neck. That horse you sit upon judging others is bloody high

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 8:55 pm #

      Um, Moods, you’re drawing a lot of conclusions. All my experiences with these matters and my attitudes to them are available to anyone here on this blog.

      Like

    • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 1, 2016 at 9:17 pm #

      “This, to me, suggests that the author has knowingly engaged in a relationship with a married man. …”

      You would appear to be unfamiliar with the blog site. That is no secret. You can read all about it under the heading ‘The practice of goodness’ at the top right hand of the page. This blog is no place for sheep.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Jim January 1, 2016 at 10:32 pm #

    Although I agree with the sentiment of the article, & agree that it is not acceptable behaviour! We don’t have both sides of the discussion. Was he “led on”, or is he just a philandering Male? Alcohol is not an excuse. Trying to change societies attitudes will take number of generations, as we are a product of our upbringing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 10:34 pm #

      Briggs admitted his behaviour was not acceptable, so we do have his side of the story.

      Like

  30. Anonymous January 1, 2016 at 10:34 pm #

    I really can’t be bothered reading all the other comments, or the article for that matter, but Im someone has already mentioned this. It is repugnant that you put a photo of his children attached to the article. His behaviour is appealing, but if you think blurring the faces of his children protects their dignity, then you are stupider than he is! There is no moral argument that can be made for attaching his children to this article. You are disrespecting them as much as Briggs disrespected the staffer in Hong Kong!

    Like

    • Anonymous January 1, 2016 at 10:36 pm #

      Clearly appealing should have read appalling… damn auto correct!

      Like

    • doug quixote January 1, 2016 at 10:38 pm #

      His own wife re-posted that photo, without pixilation, you fool.

      Try reading the article and the comments first; who knows, you might learn something.

      (eyes roll)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:40 am #

        Fool… how articulate!

        Like

    • Jennifer Wilson January 1, 2016 at 10:40 pm #

      Anonymous: A pity you can’t be bothered informing yourself before making comments such as this.

      The photo I used was posted by Mrs Briggs on Face Book after her husband resigned his portfolio, as a symbol of their happy family. The difference is Mrs Briggs did not blur the faces of her children, and I used an image that does.

      I am really not prepared to tolerate comments such as yours when you haven’t even read the article and are obviously ignorant of the story.

      Like

      • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:43 am #

        Yeah. She posted to show he is actually a guy with a family who clearly made an appalling error of judgement, and who has since paid for it. You’ve posted it to exploit the children to demonstrate the opposite.

        Im ignorant to nothing at all. Particularly the disgraceful exploitation of children by the likes of you!

        Like

    • Dr. Love January 2, 2016 at 3:30 am #

      Absolutely.

      Another angry little lady who thinks she does no wrong.

      Like

  31. J.Barraclough January 2, 2016 at 6:46 am #

    Interested in your thoughts on the allegations against Shorten.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 7:41 am #

      A complaint was made to police who investigated and I believe decided there was insufficient evidence to proceed.

      The evidence requirements in sexual assault cases are very high, I understand, as the question of consent is central.

      My thoughts are that a procedure was followed. I have no idea about the substance of the allegations, and can’t possibly have a legitimate, informed opinion on any of it, except on the fact that the procedure was followed, an outcome was reached.

      Like

      • Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 10:45 am #

        How predictable. Try taking the blinkers off, ignore your bias, and then putting pen to paper!

        Like

  32. villevilleville January 2, 2016 at 11:40 am #

    Thanks for the article, Jennifer. I’ve been pointed toward it from a few other sites (Andrew Elder’s included), and I agree with others that it’s the best summary of the situation around.

    I’m especially grateful for the insights in the comments as to what Briggs’s wife would be going through. That’s something I hadn’t considered until this point. She’s in a difficult situation now. I can understand if she wants to put it all behind her for the sake of protecting the way of life and the network she currently has – the alternative would be looking very onerous for her – but at the same time I hope she recognises that not dealing with the issue is going to mean the continuation of his behaviour down the track. it won’t just go away.

    As with many political situations, there is a cloudiness around the facts to the point where events don’t have an internal logic as yet: there’s a discrepancy at the moment between the decision to demote Briggs and the exact circumstances that warranted that dismissal. Briggs’s version of it – a compliment and a kiss on the neck – might have resulted in a reprimand (even if it warranted more than that). What actually happened has to have been a lot more damning. It’s this lack of detail that allows the likes of Chris Kenny to leap in and denounce us all for ‘over-reacting’ and bemoan the sacrifice of ‘blokiness’ to the altar of ‘political correctness’. It also allows Briggs’s colleagues to go on about him being a ‘decent man’ and talk about him returning in the future. If for no other reason than to probe the honesty of these comments, we ought to know the full story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 11:50 am #

      I’m beginning to think that way villevilleville, though I’m appalled at the prospect of what revealing details might cause in the alleged victim’s life.

      I too felt empathy for Estee Briggs, until I read the comments she made in which she trivialised the complainant’s situation and declared that Turnbull was over-reacting. Then she lost me, as I felt she was denigrating her husband’s alleged victim in order to protect his reputation.

      It’s an awful mess for everyone, including Briggs himself.

      Thanks for your comment. Cheers. Jennifer

      Like

  33. Anonymous January 2, 2016 at 11:55 am #

    Totally agree – well said.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Bob January 2, 2016 at 2:08 pm #

    I know the writer is desperate to ram home a point but one would suspect the fact he has been sacked and the vast majority of people who will take a severe view on this says it all. It was unacceptable, nearly everyone agrees, society is moving forward, its all good. But no lets not celebrate the significant change and improvment in society lets scream about it a bit more just because we need 100% agreement 100% of the time. The vocal minority really need to move on to the next when sucess happens.

    Like

    • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 2:12 pm #

      Bob, this is a blog on which I express my opinions. I do not follow your timeline, or anyone’s other than my own. If you don’t need to engage with this topic any longer I suggest you move on, leaving others to decide for themselves when they are done with it. You are not the decider of how long a topic will be discussed in the public domain.

      Like

      • Bob January 2, 2016 at 2:17 pm #

        Just my opinion. Thats ok right?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 2, 2016 at 3:18 pm #

        “You are not the decider of how long a topic will be discussed in the public domain.”

        As evidenced, at least so far as reading the blog is concerned, by a rise in the rate of hits from around 550/hour between 1:20pm and 1:50pm to around 900/hour between 1:50pm and 3:05pm, today, Saturday 2 January 2016.

        Like

        • Jennifer Wilson January 2, 2016 at 3:21 pm #

          approx 23,000 views in two days.

          Like

          • Forrest Gumpp (@ForrestGumpp) January 3, 2016 at 6:44 am #

            2625 views between 9:15pm Saturday 2 January 2016 and 6:25am Sunday 3 January 2016. This would appear to be people clicking in their own time on their own dime. What does it all mean, I wonder?

            Like

  35. Tracey January 2, 2016 at 11:21 pm #

    Mrs Briggs, with all due respect, has anyone in your life told you it is okay to demand respect from your husband? In fact, you should expect nothing less as a matter of course. As a wife I can understand your forgiving him for his betrayal, although personally I could not do that. What I don’t understand is your public support of him and, even more so, your admonishment of people who have criticised his behaviour (in support of respect of you). It makes me sad that your self esteem is so clearly almost non-existent that you so adamantly believe this treatment of you in this manner by your husband is completely acceptable and forgivable. I hope the day comes for you in the very near future when you discover just how worthwhile you are as an individual and begin to lay down expectations on people wanting to be a part of your life to treat you with the up most of respect, love and kindness. I wish you a beautiful future Mrs. Briggs.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Jennifer Wilson January 3, 2016 at 8:25 am #

    I am deleting this comment. I will not accept being called a “moll”.

    Like

  37. Darren January 3, 2016 at 11:59 am #

    Everything you said in this article does make sense. The only problem (and you pointed it out yourself) you don’t actually know the details of what happened. You’ve just grilled this bloke and basically said his a low life untrustworthy deviant and you don’t even know the full story of what happened… 👎

    Like

    • Jennifer Wilson January 3, 2016 at 12:09 pm #

      I’m assuming that the PM’s comments on the seriousness of Briggs’ offence, plus two LNP investigations, one conducted by an independent official that both found his behaviour unacceptable, is a reasonable indication that he acted improperly

      Like

      • paul walter January 4, 2016 at 8:45 am #

        You and I are convergent on these points.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jennifer Wilson January 4, 2016 at 9:14 am #

          I’m going to reply to comments later as I’m flat out cleaning up the mess after last night’s dinner party.
          Yes, this mad fucking witch cooks & cleans but only when it suits her

          Like

  38. FatalPower January 3, 2016 at 11:28 pm #

    If we intend to talk about the issue of sexual harassment as a general order of topic then I agree with your article’s title Jennifer and some of what you have to say in it. Your point is well made. I believe we need to expect more from those in public office than we do from ourselves and those we consider our family and friends… or do we?
    If we intend to further diminish this man, his political associations, and his suffering wife, who made her choice to ‘stand by him’, via smug generalisation and innuendo such as demonstrated by some of the comments left on this blog, then I say let the person who is without error write the first judgmental character assassinating comment.
    Perhaps for just one second, we could consider that there are more than just the man, his wife and the public servant involved here, all of whom are free in this country to take a range of actions for themselves and for those they care about. They don’t need our willing condemnation to dam / rescue them. I certainly don’t hear any of them asking…
    Why does it matter to the press that it is a ‘female’ public servant anyway? Is it a more grievous wrong to sexually harass a woman? Why do we lust for all the details of what occurred? Would we look at the photographs or watch indeed the video footage, should it be supplied somehow? Would we finally then be able to sit around and be self-satisfied in our own purity, given that none of us has had our private lives turned out on the table for the whole world (including our family and friends) to hear and see?
    I believe that some modicum of respect and general decency could be demonstrated instead of the opportunistic party-politic torching of another human being, his wife, a public servant (any and all, right or wrong, ‘left’ or ‘right’) and the inevitable impact that this public crucifixion has on those around them. Its not just politicians who need to lift their game here!! Oooo how we love a good crucifixion…
    Does anyone in the media (bloggers included) have a conscience on recognizing fallible human beings anymore, or are we reduced to “quick – one of our political opponents is on the ground and out for the count – let’s kick him in the teeth and smash his face in, while we can!!”
    Makes me sick to my stomach.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 4, 2016 at 12:21 pm #

      For mine, FatalPower, the fundamental issue is attitudes of male entitlement to women. I’d write about anyone of any political persuasion in the same circumstances

      Like

  39. Garry O'Sullivan January 4, 2016 at 12:32 am #

    I agree with you 100%. Congratulations on a very well written article. I admit I am guilty of skimming but this held my attention all the way.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Gayle H January 4, 2016 at 9:20 am #

    Excellent !!! Thank goodness there are women with intelligence who can rise above what has been served up to us in our society as right to be able to see what’s right and what’s wrong.

    For over 40 years I can’t understand why in almost every culture some women enable poor behaviour in some men. It’s bad enough our society has cultivated a situation where men have such poor behaviour in the first place. They don’t need enabling. Let’s not.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer Wilson January 4, 2016 at 12:15 pm #

      And then Samantha Maiden goes & tells Dutton it’s ok he trashed her…

      Like

  41. Gayle H January 4, 2016 at 9:30 am #

    Good on you – total common sense – although unfitunfortunately in our society is not common enough. What is wrong with our society! Really. When are all women going to catch on? When are all men going to catch on. Seriously ! I’m starting to believe we are a thin veneer away from apes, although that could be altogether insulting to the apes.

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Sue Smith January 4, 2016 at 1:58 pm #

    I wonder if it would so trivial if a man had said to him that he had piercing eyes?

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Anonymous January 4, 2016 at 2:44 pm #

    what a great article showing this government for what they are,as they think they were born and it’s also their right to rule, glad some one could put into words what needed to be said about this low life and anybody who backs him up is worse than he his. This type of thing just cannot be acceptable to society or any right thinking person.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Anonymous January 4, 2016 at 6:06 pm #

    Drink in, wits out.

    Liked by 1 person

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